Skip to main content
Knight-Capron Library

Knight-Capron Library: Home

RESEARCH

 

 

Use OneSearch to find articles, books, films, journals, and music, all in one place!

 

New onlineAmerican Antiquarian Society Historical Periodicals Collection‚Äč, Series 1-5

Search Online Journals
 
 
Loading ...

Follow us

facebook   flickr   twitter   youtube   pinterest   

 

SERVICES

New @ the library

Loading ...

Digital Showcase

OVER 5000 DOWNLOADS OF PAPERS BY LYNCHBURG STUDENTS!!

 

Hours

Summer Hours

Monday - Friday: 9am-5pm

Saturdays during Summer Session (5/19, 5/26, 6/9, 6/16, 6/30, 7/7): 11am-5pm

All other Saturdays: Closed

Sunday: Closed

Have a Question?

Phone: 434.544.8575

Text:: 434.264.5513

Email: refdesk@lynchburg.edu

 

Recent Additions

Facing Freedom

Daniel Thorp relates the complex experience of an African American community -- Blacksburg, in Montgomery County, Virginia -- as it negotiated a radically new world in the four decades following the Civil War.

Adolescents' New Literacies with and Through Mobile Phones

This book provides a deeper understanding of the phone-based composing practices of youth and their implications for literacy learning. In the United States, smartphone use among teens is nearly universal, yet many youth who are avid digital composers still struggle with formal schooled literacy.

Gender and the Modern Sherlock Holmes

Focusing on the Guy Ritchie films, the BBC's Sherlock and CBS's Elementary, this collection of new essays explores the ideas and implications behind these adaptations.

Reading the Rainbow

Drawing on examples from K - 5 classrooms, the authors make clear what LGBTQ-inclusive literacy teaching can look like in practice, including what teaches might say and how students might respond.

Who Were the First Christians?

Were there fewer Christians in the Roman world? Was the Roman world much more urbanized that we previously thought? Did large numbers of Jews convert to Christianity? Or, as Thomas Robinson argues, is the urban thesis defective, and the neglected countryside must now be considered in any reconstruction of early Christian growth?